Current Public Health Vacancies


Lecturer | Senior Lecturer | Associate Professor in Māori Health

Pūkenga | Pūkenga Matua | Ahorangi Tuarua i te hauora Māori

School of Health Sciences | Te Kura Mātai Hauora

College of Education, Health and Human Development | Te Rāngai Ako me te Hauora

University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha

Location: Christchurch, New Zealand | Ōtautahi, Aotearoa

Full-time at 37.5 hours per week (1.0 FTE)

Continuing (i.e. permanent) position

Kia hiwa rā, kia hiwa rā!

He hiahia, he pūkenga nōu ki te mātai hauora ā-hapori whānui? He pōwhiri atu tēnei nā Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha kia tono mai te hunga i te tūranga Pūkenga, Pūkenga Matua rānei i Te Kura Mātai Hauora i Te Rāngai Ako me te Hauora.

What You Will Do

Applications are invited for an academic continuing position in Te Kura Mātai Hauora | School of Health Sciences in the area of Maori Health. The holder of the position will provide contributions to the delivery of coursework, research supervision, and administrative duties related to undergraduate and postgraduate programmes within Health Sciences. Priority will be given to those with expertise in the following areas: community focused health services, health programme design and evaluation, epidemiology, health informatics and/or population health in the areas of nutrition, diverse populations and/or addressing health inequities, however those with strengths/expertise in other areas are welcome to apply.

In addition the successful candidate will be active in research and scholarship, and where appropriate, be involved in applications for funding to support that work. You will develop a track record of peer reviewed research publications, acquiring peer recognition for your research and scholarly work is also important.

Who You Are

An active commitment to continuing professional development, including bicultural professional development, and applying that learning in everyday practice is expected. This includes a commitment to upholding the values, tikanga, kawa and traditions as guided by Ngāi Tūāhuriri, the mana whenua. Ability in te reo Māori me āna tikanga would be an advantage.

For information on our team, School and our current undergraduate and postgraduate programmes follow the links School of Health Sciences, the Bachelor of Health Sciences degree, and the Postgraduate qualification in Child and Family Psychology.

Who You Will Work With

Te Kura Mātai Hauora | School of Health Sciences offers undergraduate and postgraduate programmes and research activities that respond to the dynamic nature of the health sector and its workforce. These include the undergraduate Bachelor of Health Sciences degree and various population health and clinical endorsements within the Postgraduate Diploma and Masters of Health Sciences. Other postgraduate programmes include Child and Family Psychology, Counselling, Nursing, Sport Science, and Specialist Teaching. You will develop relationships with Amokapua Pākākano | Amokapua Māori, Pacific and Equity working with UC's Maori Development Strategy and UC's Bicultural Competence and Confidence Framework.

The School offers these exciting research and teaching opportunities through its new home, the Rehua building, a world class facility located in the heart of Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha | University of Canterbury Ilam Campus with modern digital technologies and innovative learning and social spaces that encourage collaboration and multidisciplinary ways of working. UC is also a partner with space in Manawa, the new health research and education facility in Christchurch's Te Papa Hauora / Health Precinct; bringing together health researchers and PhD students to collaborate and innovate alongside Canterbury District Health Board (CDHB)clinical staff.

Why UC

Tangata Tū, Tangata Ora - Engaged, Empowered, Making a Difference.

The University of Canterbury is committed to accessible higher education, service to the community and the encouragement of talent without barriers of distance, wealth, class, gender or ethnicity. The University explicitly aims to produce graduates and support staff who are engaged with their communities, empowered to act for good and determined to make a difference in the world.

We are an Equal Employment Opportunities (EEO) employer and we encourage diversity in our staffing profile. The University of Canterbury actively seeks to meet its obligation under the Treaty of Waitangi | Te Tiriti o Waitangi.

The University of Canterbury is a leading University in New Zealand, with over 15,000 students across five colleges. We are located in Christchurch - the gateway to the South Island of New Zealand with easy access to the Southern Alps and renowned skiing, hiking, fishing, whale watching, mountain biking and other outdoor destinations and facilities to support a work-life-balance lifestyle.

We offer a range of fantastic benefits including flexible work practices, study opportunities and generous superannuation and leave provisions. For more information, please visit us; http://www.canterbury.ac.nz/joinus

For more information about the University of Canterbury, please visit www.canterbury.ac.nz

The closing date for this position is: Sunday, 6 September 2020 (midnight, NZ time)

How to Apply

Applications for this position must be submitted online through our careers website and should include:

a 'cover letter' including a 2-3 page statement outlining your research interests and goals, teaching philosophy, and your thoughts on how to develop a successful Health Sciences team, and

a 'curriculum vitae' which includes a list of relevant research publications.

Unfortunately we do not accept applications by email, however we are happy to answer your queries in relation to the application process. Please forward these to WorkatUC@canterbury.ac.nz

For further information specifically about the role, please contact Professor Philip Schluter, philip.schluter@canterbury.ac.nz

Job Details

Reference # 2640

Posted on 10 Jul 2020

Closes on 06 Sep 2020 23:55

Location(s) Christchurch

Expertise Health, Lecturer

Job level(s) Academic

Work type(s) Continuing (Permanent) full-time

More details (document)

Position description 1 PositionDescription_Lecturer.pdf

Position description 2 PositionDescription_SeniorLecturer.pdf

Position description 3 PositionDescription_AssociateProfessor.pdf



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If you have any enquiries or you wish to place an advertisement please send the details of your vacancy to pha@pha.org.nz.


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  • 14 May 2019 1:19 PM | Anonymous

    Zero Carbon Bill is critical legislation for health, but targets are too little, too late

    Health professionals have offered a mixed response to today’s release of the Zero Carbon Bill.

    They applaud its purpose to prevent global warming of more than 1.5 degrees, but say aspects of the Bill lack the necessary urgency and accountability.

    “The Bill’s targets as they stand today would be too little, too late,” says Dr Rhys Jones, Coconvenor of OraTaiao: NZ Climate and Health Council.

    “The Zero Carbon Bill is too weak on agricultural emissions which comprise almost half of New Zealand’s total greenhouse gas emissions. We need to see a move away from beef and dairy for both the sake of human and planetary health,” says Dr Jones.

    The Zero Carbon Bill sets a target of 10 per cent reduction in biological methane emissions by 2030, and aims for a provisional reduction ranging from 24 per cent to 47 per cent by 2050.

    “Our food production systems are threatening local ecosystems and contributing to climate change, while unhealthy diets are a significant contributor to major health problems such as heart disease, diabetes and cancers. But on the other hand, a rapid transition to a healthy plant-based food system could go a long way to addressing major health issues including obesity, heart disease and protecting our drinking water.”

    Dr Jones was speaking from the 2nd Sustainable Healthcare Forum in Wellington today where leaders from a range of sectors gathered to share ideas about reducing greenhouse gas emissions from the health sector. Forum participants have called on the Government to set greenhouse gas emission targets for District Health Boards.

    “Health professionals are extremely concerned about the impacts of climate change on the health of people and communities. At the same time, we are excited about the health opportunities that well-designed climate action can bring,” says Dr Jones.

    “A strong Zero Carbon Bill that emphasises fairness and upholds Te Tiriti o Waitangi is critical for a healthy future for New Zealanders.”

    ENDS

    Media Spokesperson: Dr Rhys Jones, 021 411 743

    Dr Rhys Jones (Ngāti Kahungunu) (rg.jones@auckland.ac.nz) is a Public Health Physician and Senior Lecturer at the University of Auckland, and Co-convenor of OraTaiao: The New Zealand Climate and Health Council.

    OraTaiao: The New Zealand Climate & Health Council is a health professional organisation urgently focusing on the health threats of climate change and the health opportunities of climate action. See: www.orataiao.org.nz

    Notes to editors:

    About Climate Change and Health

    Information is available in the following paper from the 2014 NZ Medical Journal: ‘Health and equity impacts of climate change in Aotearoa-New Zealand, and health gains from climate action’. http://www.nzma.org.nz/journal/read-the-journal/all-issues/2010-2019/2014/vol-127-no-1406/6366

    Health threats from climate changes include: worsening illness and injury from heat and other extreme weather, changing patterns of infection including food poisoning, loss of seafood and farming livelihoods, food price rises and mass migration from the Pacific. Those on low incomes, Māori, Pacific people, children and older people will be hit first and hardest, but nobody will be immune to the widespread health and social threats of unchecked climate change. Direct and indirect climate change impacts are already being seen here from warming oceans and sea level rise.

    Health opportunities from reducing greenhouse gas emissions, easing pressure on health budgets include: rapidly phasing out coal; switching from car trips to more walking, cycling and public transport; healthier diets lower in red meat and dairy; and energy efficient, warm homes will all cut emissions while also reducing the diseases that kill New Zealanders most and put our children in hospital – cancer, heart disease, lung diseases and car crash injuries.

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